Incident Details


General Information
Title: Collapse and crash
Date: 01/06/2008
Time: 14:30
Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado

Pilot Information
Age: 43
Gender: Male
Pilot weight (without motor): 210 US Pounds
Rating: Instructor
Experience: 50+ Hours Solo

Incident Detail Information
Type of Incident: Wing Malfunction or Deflation
Primary Cause: Pilot Error and Weather
Contributing Distractions: None
Windspeed: Not Applicable
Wind Type: Gusting
Thermal Conditions: Unknown
Visibility: Clear
Surface: Snow
Terrain: Flat
Site Elevation: 6750 (feet above sea level)
Phase of Flight: Approach
Purpose of Flight: Recreation

Safety Gear Used:
None
Helmet Full
Helmet Other
Protective Boots
Knee-pads
Elbow-pads
Wrist Guards
Reserve
Knife
Gloves
Strobe
Unknown

Communications: Not Applicable
Damage to Pilot's Equipment: Severe (Greater than 20% of New Price)
Wing: 2003 Sol Yaris L afnor 1-2
Motor: 2003 Fresh Bresh Old style comfort bars 72lbs with fuel

Injury Information
Pilot/Passenger Injury Severity: Major Injury
Hosipitalization: 3+ Nights

Injuries:
None
Head
Face
Neck
Chest
Back
Abdomen
Shoulder
Arm
Elbow
Forearm
Wrist
Hand
Pelvis
Thigh
Calf
Ankle
Foot
Knee
Unknown

Collateral Damage:
None
By-Stander
Other Pilot
Animal
Property
Unknown

Narrative: I had put up my gear once due to some doubt about the conditions, but watched the wind sock for a while and decided to give it a try. The wind was 7mph SE and seemed to be steady at liftoff where I climbed to 300ft/agl. I felt something very different in the handling of my wing and after checking my equipment decided to land and pack it in. On approach to my LZ I noticed the wind direction had changed 90 degrees and was now coming from the west which was across the front range of the rockies 5 miles to my west. I took a 90% deep asymmetric on the right side of my wing that dropped me down and spun me 180 degrees to my wing. At some point during the first few seconds of deflation my throttle was wrapped causing it to go full throttle which it remained until impact with the ground.

Photo: