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Incident Details


General Information
Title: Hard Landing - turn to close to ground
Date: 04/26/2012
Time: 0900
Location: florida

Pilot Information
Age: 50
Gender: Male
Pilot weight (without motor): 185 US Pounds
Rating: Intermediate (PPG2 or Equivalent)
Experience: 10-50 Hours Solo

Incident Detail Information
Type of Incident: Hard Landing
Primary Cause: Mechanical Failure: Powerplant/Propeller
Contributing Distractions: None
Windspeed: Moderate (5-9 MPH)
Wind Type: Steady
Thermal Conditions: None
Visibility: clear
Surface: Grass
Terrain: Flat
Site Elevation: (feet above sea level)
Phase of Flight: Landing
Purpose of Flight: Not Applicable

Safety Gear Used:
None
Helmet Full
Helmet Other
Protective Boots
Knee-pads
Elbow-pads
Wrist Guards
Reserve
Knife
Gloves
Strobe
Unknown

Communications: Not Applicable
Damage to Pilot's Equipment: Minor (Less than 20% of New Price)
Wing: macpara IV
Motor: Fresh Breeze Simonini

Injury Information
Pilot/Passenger Injury Severity: None
Hosipitalization: Not Applicable

Injuries:
None
Head
Face
Neck
Chest
Back
Abdomen
Shoulder
Arm
Elbow
Forearm
Wrist
Hand
Pelvis
Thigh
Calf
Ankle
Foot
Knee
Unknown

Collateral Damage:
None
By-Stander
Other Pilot
Animal
Property
Unknown

Narrative: Pilot received PPG 2 using a trike. Pilot was performing a foot launch. Launch was successful. However, motor was missing making climbout difficult. Pilot made turn back to field at less than 50ft to attempt a downwind landing and avoid obstacles outside the landing zone. Turn was fine and pilot would have made the downwind landing successfully. However, once into the wind, he felt the landing speed was going to be too high. He tried to execute a turn to get more into the wind, but was too low and spiraled into ground. Learning is that once a landing decision is made at low altitude, pilot must be committed. Turns at low altitude create to much altitude loss and take away the opportunity to flare the wing creating an uncontrolled landing situation.

Photo:  No photo on file.